War memorial in Flitwick gets a Grade II listing ahead of Remembrance weekend

It’s one of seven in the East of England similarly listed by Historic England
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The First World War memorial in Flitwick has been newly listed at Grade II ahead of Armistice Day and Remembrance Sunday.

The memorial, to commemorate the sacrifice of those killed during the Great War, is one of seven in the East of England similarly listed by Historic England.

The memorial at Flitwick stands at the junction of Kings Road and Station Road in the centre of the town. It consists of a Celtic cross with a sword carved in relief on its front (north west) elevation.

The war memorial at Flitwick is one of seven to be listed ahead of Remembrance weekendThe war memorial at Flitwick is one of seven to be listed ahead of Remembrance weekend
The war memorial at Flitwick is one of seven to be listed ahead of Remembrance weekend

Below the cross the plinth is inscribed with the words: ‘In grateful and glorious memory of the men of this parish who fought, and of the following who fell in the Great War 914-1918’ and the 29 names of the men who lost their lives in the First World War.

The memorial was unveiled in October 1920 at a ceremony attended by the Duke of Bedford and local dignitaries. Following the Second World War a further 14 names were added to the memorial as a lasting testament to local people who served in conflict.

The listing was approved by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, on the advice of Historic England.

Arts and Heritage Minister Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay, said: “The long roll of honour inscribed on memorials across the land are a powerful and poignant reminder of the huge sacrifices made by so many families during the two World Wars.

“Each year, we recommit ourselves to ensuring that the names of those who laid down their lives in our defence will never be forgotten. I am glad that these memorials are being listed so that the names they proudly bear will live for evermore.”

Historic England offers information and guidance of how to help care for the war memorial in your community here

It also invites people to help to discover the people’s stories behind the names on the war memorials by adding their own stories, information and photographs. Find details via Historic England’s Missing Pieces Project.