Bedfordshire Fire and Rescue Service sets new response standards - including 12-minute target to arrive on scene

Targets also include mobilising in just two minutes
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A change to the way incident response performance is measured have been approved following a consultation by Bedfordshire Fire and Rescue Authority last Thursday (28 March).

The new response measures simplify standards to make reporting clearer, align BFRS to other fire and rescue services and match how the Government reports performance.

They also combine both the call handling and response times to make one standard that measures the life cycle of the emergency call.

New response standards have been approved for Beds Fire ServiceNew response standards have been approved for Beds Fire Service
New response standards have been approved for Beds Fire Service

The new standard starts from when a 999 call is received, until the time the first fire engine arrives at the incident.

The new operational response performance measures include:

> Mobilise to primary fires within 120 seconds, 85% of the time.

> First fire engine to arrive in 12 minutes to primary fires on 80% of occasions, measured from time of call

> Second fire engine mobilised to a primary fire as part of the initial attendance will arrive in 16 mins on 80% of occasions, from

time of call

> RTCs, we will arrive in 15 minutes on 80% of occasions, measured from time of call (incorporating the existing time of alert measure

with the new call handling measure)

> For secondary fires one fire engine will arrive in 20 minutes on 96% of occasions, measured from time of call.

The number of fire engines sent to different incident types will not change and the Service is committed to always sending enough resources to deliver a safe system of work for crews and ensure the best outcome for those involved.

Area Commander Stuart Auger, Head of Response, said: “Changing our measures to keep pace with the changing communities of Bedfordshire means our promise to the public is even clearer than before. “We know these targets might sometimes be hard to reach, but they give the Service a clear aim for what we want to be delivering as a quality service to the community.

“The changes also remove an existing standard about the number of firefighters riding a fire engine, which gives us more freedom to use firefighters on shift in a smarter way to maximise the number of fire engines available for the public of Bedfordshire, to increase public safety and save lives.”

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