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Dad is on the road to recovery after brain injury

Martin Woolard suffered a serious brain injury last year. He is pictured here at home at Christmas with his wife Tabby

Martin Woolard suffered a serious brain injury last year. He is pictured here at home at Christmas with his wife Tabby

A brave dad-of-three who suffered a life-altering major brain injury last year is now on the road to recovery after spending six months in intensive rehabilitation.

Martin Woolard, 43, collapsed and fell unconscious out of the blue last summer when he and his wife Tabby were on holiday visiting friends in Dorset.

Martin, who lives with his wife Tabby and three boys in Ridgmont, was left partially sighted, struggled to process thoughts and his speech became very slurred. He also had very limited mobility after the incident.

Over the last six months he has been recovering at the Thomas Edward Milton House in Buckingham, part of the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust, where he has come on leaps and bounds.

It is not known how long Martin will need to remain at the centre before he can return home permanently. But thanks to the support at the centre he managed to make it home to spend Christmas Eve and Christmas Day at home with his family.

His wife Tabby said he started to become “less confused” as he began to feel more comfortable at the centre,

She said: “Martin’s sight started to come back gradually. It was discovered one lunchtime with the family at TEM house.

“Martin looked at a support worker from TEM house and was able to comment on particular details on her face, it was truly amazing”.

Martin started physiotherapy, he became mobile and was able to sit up on the end of his bed unassisted which he was unable to do before moving in to TEM House.

As time progressed he began to stand up and then to walk with a walking aide.

Horror struck following a barbecue on the beach when Martin suffered with a ruptured brain aneurysm.

Fortunately Martin’s friend performed CPR - not only did he manage to resuscitate him once but twice, saving his life and keeping him alive long enough to be reached by the emergency services.

He underwent a life-saving operation before being moved to the centre to begin his recovery.

Martin is now back at the centre but is working hard in rehab so he can take more frequent trips away from the centre and see his children at school events.

 

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