Device to help detect bone problems wins award for hospital and uni research collaboraters

Dr Len Gelman from Cranfield Uni and Dr Mohammed Wasil, Assistant Director of Research and Development at Bedford Hospital, with their award.

Dr Len Gelman from Cranfield Uni and Dr Mohammed Wasil, Assistant Director of Research and Development at Bedford Hospital, with their award.

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Bedford Hospital and Cranfield University are celebrating having won the first ever Public-Private Collaboration Award as sponsored by the Oxford Academic Health Science Network.

They were among four partnerships that were shortlisted for the award, which aims to acknowledge effective partnerships across both private and public sectors.

Dr Mohammed Wasil, Assistant Director of Research and Development at Bedford Hospital, and Professor Len Gelman of Cranfield University and the President of the International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration, were awarded the prize at the annual event on Thursday, October 2 for their work in developing a new tool for the early diagnosis of osteoporosis and bone fractures.

The new tool is a mobile, automatic, low-cost, radiation-free and reliable tool for detecting problems with bones. It can be used by a wide range of health professionals and in situations where other scans are impractical.

It also poses no further health risk to patients, unlike like other methods of bone scanning, and so should lead to fewer hospital admissions.

Doctor Mohammed Wasil said: “Considering the excellent work done by all the partnerships that were nominated it is a real honour to have won.”

“Myself and Professor Gelman are incredibly proud to represent Bedford Hospital and Cranfield University in collecting this prestigious award. We are hopefull that the research and development that we have completed thus far can be continued to make this new technology available to many patients in the future.”

The new tool has been experimentally validated under laboratory conditions at Cranfield University and once the prototype has been completed, Bedford Hospital NHS Trust will begin to conduct clinical trials.

It is hoped that if successful, this development could be utilised by health professionals that currently are not able to conduct bone scans or X-Rays, such as paramedics treating patients in ambulances or general practitioners.